Price: $666
Processor: MOS 6502
RAM: 4 KB
Clock speed: 1 MHz
Keyboard: Not included

Jobs and Steve Wozniak form Apple Computer to start selling the Apple I, a kit for computer enthusiasts.

“With the addition of a keyboard and video monitor, you’ll have an extremely powerful computer system that can be used for anything from developing programs to playing games or ­running BASIC.” —Apple I ­advertisement, 1976

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek
Price: $666
Processor: MOS 6502
RAM: 4 KB
Clock speed: 1 MHz
Keyboard: Not included

Jobs and Steve Wozniak form Apple Computer to start selling the Apple I, a kit for computer enthusiasts.

“With the addition of a keyboard and video monitor, you’ll have an extremely powerful computer system that can be used for anything from developing programs to playing games or ­running BASIC.” —Apple I ­advertisement, 1976

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek

Steve’s Touch

Apple I (April 1976 – September 1977)
Apple I (April 1976 – September 1977)
Price: $666
Processor: MOS 6502
RAM: 4 KB
Clock speed: 1 MHz
Keyboard: Not included

Jobs and Steve Wozniak form Apple Computer to start selling the Apple I, a kit for computer enthusiasts.

“With the addition of a keyboard and video monitor, you’ll have an extremely powerful computer system that can be used for anything from developing programs to playing games or ­running BASIC.” —Apple I ­advertisement, 1976

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek
Apple IIe (1983)
Apple IIe (1983)

"It's impossible to tell you everything there is to know about using the Apple IIe because computers are ­chameleons."
—Owners’ manual

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe

Lisa (1983)
Lisa (1983)

Apple dumped 2,700 Lisas into a landfill in Logan, Utah, in order to write off the unsold inventory.

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe

Macintosh 128K (January 1984 – October 1985)
Macintosh 128K (January 1984 – October 1985)
Price: $2,495
Dimensions: 14 x 10 x 11
Clock speed: 8 MHz
Weight: 16.5 lbs.
RAM: 128 KB

Apple airs its “1984” ad during the Super Bowl. TV Guide later declares it the best commercial of all time. The owner of the television rights to George Orwell’s classic sends a cease-and-desist letter to Apple’s ad agency. The spot is never aired again.

“It didn’t just change Apple, it changed the whole computer industry.” —Jobs at Macworld Expo, 2007

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
Macintosh Portable (September 1989 – October 1991)
Macintosh Portable (September 1989 – October 1991)
Price: $6,500
Dimensions: 4 x 15 x 15
Processor: Motorola Int.
Storage: 40 MB
Display: 9.8 in. LCD
Weight: 15.8 lbs.
Clock Speed: 16 MHz
Ext. Storage: 1.44 MB floppy
Resolution: 640 x 400

Foxconn, the Taiwanese manufacturer which today assembles iPhones and other Apple devices, sets up its first factory in mainland China.

The crew of the space shuttle Atlantis used a Macintosh Portable to send the first e-mail from space in 1991.

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
iMac (May 1998 – January 1999)
iMac (May 1998 – January 1999)
Price: $1,299
Dimensions: 16 x 15 x 18
Clock speed: 233 MHz
Weight: 40 lbs.
RAM: 384 MB

"iMac is next year's computer for $1,299, not last year's computer for $999." —Jobs at Macworld Expo, 1998

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
PowerBook G3 (1998)
PowerBook G3 (1998)

"Big and beautiful, the PowerBook G3 is perhaps the first portable computer that warrants being called sensual." —New York Times review, 1998

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe

Cube (July 2000 – July 2001)
Cube (July 2000 – July 2001)
Price: $1,799
Dimensions: 10 x 8 x 8
Weight:14 lbs.

“The cube has found a definite market. The disappointment to us was the market wasn’t as big as we thought.” —Jobs at an analysts meeting, 2001
Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
iPod (October 2001 – April 2003)
iPod (October 2001 – April 2003)
Price: $399
Capacity: 5GB
Playtime: 10 hours

"This amazing little device holds a ­thousand songs and fits in my pocket." —Jobs at product launch, 2001

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
iMac G4 (January 2002 – February 2003)
iMac G4 (January 2002 – February 2003)
Price: $1,299
Dimensions: 20 x 15 x 16
Weight: 21.3 lbs.

"Let each element be what it is, be true to itself. ... It should look like a sunflower." —Jobs quoted in Time magazine, 2002

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
iBook G4 (October 2003 – April 2004)
iBook G4 (October 2003 – April 2004)
Price: $1,099
Dimensions: 1 x 11 x 9
Weight: 4.9 lbs.

The last version of the iBook looked so much like its predecessors, Apple published a field guide to help customers identify the iBook G4 by its "more opaque finish."


Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
iMac G5 (August 2004 – May 2005)
iMac G5 (August 2004 – May 2005)
Price: $1,299
Dimensions: 17 x 17 x 7
Weight: 18.5 lbs.

"The computer goes away. I think this is the ultimate design expression of an all-in-one computer." —Greg Joswiak, Apple's Vice-President of Hardware Marketing, 2004

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
IPhone (2007)
IPhone (2007)

"We're going to use the best pointing device in the world. We're going to use a pointing device that we’re all born with—born with ten of them. We're going to use our fingers."—Jobs at Macworld Expo, 2007

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe

MacBook Air (2008)
MacBook Air (2008)

"To fit an entire Mac on this thing was an ­amazing feat of engineering." —Jobs at Macworld Expo, 2008

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe

iPad (January 2010 – March 2011)
iPad (January 2010 – March 2011)
Price: $499
Dimensions: 10 x 7 x .5
Clock speed: 1 GHz
Screen: 9.7 in. LCD
Weight: 1.5 lbs.
Capacity: 16GB
Resolution: 1024 x 768

"Our most advanced technology in a magical and revolutionary device at an unbelievable price." —Jobs at product launch, 2010

Photograph by Jamie Chung for Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Special thanks to TekServe
Big Four Accounting Firms Dominate Top Ten
Big Four Accounting Firms Dominate Top Ten

Each year, the Stockholm-based research firm Universum skips all the hype and goes straight to college students to ask them where they would like to work. The survey contacts more than 160,000 business and engineering students in the biggest markets, from Brazil to China to the U.S., and asks them to identify what they regard as top employers.

The favored companies, nonprofits, and government agencies are organizations that tend to offer flexible work options, great benefits, mentoring, and such perks as discounts on day care, free food, and places to play. Not surprisingly—considering public sentiment on banking—the companies that dropped off the list this year included ING Direct (ING) and Barclays Bank (BARC:LN).

Technology is big, with the top spot held by a tech giant. Again, the Big Four accounting firms all placed well in Universum’s ranking. Last year, the firm's list reflected major changes that accompanied the economic downturn, with such companies as Apple (AAPL) and American Express (AXP) appearing for the first time. This year's list changed far less as many companies maintained their honors.

Above, the new design for Apple's headquarters in Silicon Valley.

Here are the top 50 employers, in reverse order.

Methodology: Universum surveyed more than 160,000 undergraduate business and engineering students worldwide, asking each to identify the five employers for which he or she would most like to work. Students chose from a list of employers compiled from those identified as ideal in Universum's 2010 survey and tailored to each of the 12 major global markets in which the survey was conducted; they were allowed to write in the names of desirable employers not on the list. The ranking is based on the percentage of business students that placed each employer among the top five. (A separate roster based on engineering students’ responses was also created; General Motors (GM), Oracle (ORCL), BP (BP), Schlumberger (SLB), Philips (PHG), Bayer (BAYN:GR), Bosch, Lenovo (992:HK), BASF (BAS:GR), Ericsson (ERIC), and ABB (ABBN:VX) were top 50 employers in the engineering ranking that were not included in this slide show.) Of the top 50 employers in the business student ranking, 11 are Universum global consulting clients. NR=not ranked in top 50.

Above photo: Courtesy of City of San Bernardino. All following photographs by Bloomberg.