Democrats and Republicans walked 20 paces, turned, aimed—and then holstered their weapons. A zero-hour budget deal on Apr. 8 narrowly averted the first government shutdown since 1996. The parties agreed to $38 billion in cuts in a compromise bill scheduled for an Apr. 14 vote by the House. A look at some of the programs that narrowly escaped the guillotine—and those that didn’t.
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Democrats and Republicans walked 20 paces, turned, aimed—and then holstered their weapons. A zero-hour budget deal on Apr. 8 narrowly averted the first government shutdown since 1996. The parties agreed to $38 billion in cuts in a compromise bill scheduled for an Apr. 14 vote by the House. A look at some of the programs that narrowly escaped the guillotine—and those that didn’t.
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Winners and Losers of the Budget Showdown

Shutdown Averted
Shutdown Averted
Democrats and Republicans walked 20 paces, turned, aimed—and then holstered their weapons. A zero-hour budget deal on Apr. 8 narrowly averted the first government shutdown since 1996. The parties agreed to $38 billion in cuts in a compromise bill scheduled for an Apr. 14 vote by the House. A look at some of the programs that narrowly escaped the guillotine—and those that didn’t.
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Got a Raise: D.C. Vouchers
Got a Raise: D.C. Vouchers
Not many programs are scheduled to get a budget increase—but then again, there aren’t many that are the personal priorities of House Speaker John Boehner. Known to get weepy just talking about education, Boehner made sure the budget deal revived a school voucher program in the nation's capital killed by Democrats in 2009.
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Got a Raise: Military Helicopters
Got a Raise: Military Helicopters
Lawmakers added funding to replace three Black Hawk helicopters lost in wars and accelerate the purchase of 12 more. The choppers are made by United Technologies’ Sikorsky unit.
sgt suzanne m jenkins usaf
Frozen: Corporation for Public Broadcasting
Frozen: Corporation for Public Broadcasting
It seemed like only a matter of time before House Republicans would “liberate,” as one lawmaker put it, National Public Radio from federal funding. The House voted twice to eliminate NPR’s budget, though neither bill made it through the Senate. In the end, CPB saw its $445 million budget essentially frozen.
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Frozen & Cut Less than Expected: National Institutes of Health
Frozen & Cut Less than Expected: National Institutes of Health
House Republicans had proposed a $1.6 billion, or 5 percent, cut in the budget of NIH, the medical research arm of the federal government. That was rolled back during negotiations with the Senate, and now the NIH faces a $260 million cut, or about 0.8 percent, from last year.
Bloomberg
Frozen & Cut Less than Expected: Pell Grants
Frozen & Cut Less than Expected: Pell Grants
Democrats kept the maximum grant size at $5,550, despite Republican calls for a 15 percent cut. Pell grants for summer school students will be eliminated.
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Slashed: F-35 Alternative Engine
Slashed: F-35 Alternative Engine
Boehner's might wasn’t enough to save an alternative engine program for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The program was killed by his Republican colleagues during debate over the House’s draft of the bill; the Speaker’s Ohio district includes a plant that will be threatened with job losses as a result.
Bloomberg
Slashed: National Endowment for the Arts
Slashed: National Endowment for the Arts
Arts programs can be an easy target for lawmakers searching for savings. House Republicans approved a 25 percent cut for the NEA, which funds theaters, orchestras, ballets, and ­museums. Democrats balked, and the NEA emerged with a 7.4 percent ­reduction.
Capital Concerts Inc.
Slashed: Environmental Protection Agency
Slashed: Environmental Protection Agency
The regulator will lose about $1.6 billion. That’s a reduction of 16 percent, about half of what Republicans initially proposed, though still one of the budget deal's biggest cuts.
Bloomberg
High-Speed Rail
High-Speed Rail
The regulator will lose about $1.6 billion. That’s a reduction of 16 percent, about half of what Republicans initially proposed, though still one of the budget deal's biggest cuts.
Bloomberg