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Bloomberg Wealth: The New World of Work May Blow Your Budget

Workers carry lunch to go on 2nd Street in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. About 21% of San Francisco areas office workers had returned as of Sept. 22, according to Kastle Systemsa figure that is little changed since the summer and the lowest among 10 U.S. metro areas.
Workers carry lunch to go on 2nd Street in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. About 21% of San Francisco areas office workers had returned as of Sept. 22, according to Kastle Systemsa figure that is little changed since the summer and the lowest among 10 U.S. metro areas.Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

Programming note: Millennials are saving early for retirement. What does this mean for their futures? Join us today at 12:30 p.m. ET for a live Twitter Spaces discussion.

What’s the most significant investment you’ll make? Not Bitcoin (unless you bought a lot, several years ago) and not even, say, those risk-free U.S. savings bonds with a near-10% yield. For most of us, our jobs are our most significant investments. The stakes are long-term, the returns — our wages — are predictable, the risks generally low. But with inflation eating into earnings, the factors that go into our cost-benefit calculations of what we get from our jobs have shifted.