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MapLab: New Exhibit Explores the Geographies of Fiction

A new exhibit explores how maps shape the stories we read — and vice versa. 

Map from front endpapers to The Odyssey of Homer (translated by T. E. Shaw (Col. T. E. Lawrence)), 1935. Printed book. © Oxford University Press, Inc. 

Map from front endpapers to The Odyssey of Homer (translated by T. E. Shaw (Col. T. E. Lawrence)), 1935. Printed book. © Oxford University Press, Inc. 

Reproduced with permission of the Licensor through PSLclear. The Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens

A new exhibit at the Huntington Library, Art Museum and Gardens near Los Angeles peels back the layered relationship between maps and novels, with a special focus on one of the most famously place-based yarns of the 20th century: Ulysses

Marking the centennial of James Joyce’s iconic novel, which was first published in February 1922, the exhibit “Mapping Fiction” includes works by Joyce as well as William Faulkner, Octavia E. Butler, J. R. R. Tolkien and many other writers who’ve built rich landscapes through story. Objects include first and rare book editions, as well as maps that have appeared both inside those books and on cultural artifacts they've influenced. The exhibit also features unpublished maps that served as sketches for the authors.