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CityLab Daily: The Economic Impact of a Remote Worker Migration

Also today: Kaiser Permanente reaches union pact, and responses to Tucson’s minimum wage law. 

Over the past three years, Tulsa has been paying remote workers to relocate. Many of them are staying. 

Over the past three years, Tulsa has been paying remote workers to relocate. Many of them are staying. 

Photographer: Sarah Holder

This special edition of the CityLab newsletter focuses on the changing nature of work — and the repercussions for the places and spaces we inhabit. Send your feedback and ideas to sholder6@bloomberg.net.

Imagine, if you can, October 2019. I am in a crowded Oktoberfest celebration in Tulsa, Oklahoma, with hundreds of revelers swigging beer from boot-shaped cups. Half a dozen of them came together on a school bus, and stuck together for most of the night. They were a ragtag group that moved to Tulsa from cities across the country — from Los Angeles to Louisville — with a few key things in common. At some point in the last year, they had all seen an ad or an article or were sent a link to apply for a weird new program that would pay them $10,000 to move to Tulsa. They all worked remotely, and had little tying them down. They all decided to take the leap. And despite some initial doubts, they all seemed to be having a fantastic time.