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CityLab Daily: Hospitals May Look Very Different After Covid

Also today: Cities are sinking under the weight of urban development, and the energy costs that will dog Texans for decades.

Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, designed by Perkins and Will, was built to anticipate pandemics and other mass casualty events.

Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, designed by Perkins and Will, was built to anticipate pandemics and other mass casualty events.

Photographer: Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives via Getty Images

Health conscious: The pandemic threw into stark relief the inequities and weaknesses of the U.S. health care system. Scenes of refrigerator trucks stacked with bodies because funeral homes were full and families saying goodbye to loved ones via iPad pushed health institutions to implement a number of changes that would help them meet the challenges presented by Covid-19.

These adaptations come in many forms, from a greater emphasis on telemedicine to attempts at bringing ambulatory care closer to communities of all income levels. They include shifts in the way hospitals look and feel, as facilities undergo transformations meant to enhance both wellness and disease treatment. As obstetrician Neel Shah of Ariadne Labs put it to contributor James S. Russell, “things that advocates have pursued for decades are now happening.” Today on CityLab: What the Post-Pandemic Hospital Might Look Like