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Pearl Block, a small multifamily building in Victoria, British Columbia, is designed to squeeze six units on a triangle-shaped lot. 

Pearl Block, a small multifamily building in Victoria, British Columbia, is designed to squeeze six units on a triangle-shaped lot. 

Photo: Ema Peter courtesy of D'Arcy Jones Architects. Illustration: Stephanie Davidson

CityLab
Design

How Do You Wedge a Condo Into a Tiny Site? Work the Angles

The developer wanted to fit multiple units on a small, oddly shaped parcel of land in a neighborhood of traditional homes in British Columbia. 

(This story is part of “Look at That Building,” a weekly Bloomberg CityLab series about everyday — and not-so-everyday — architecture. Read more from the series, and sign up to get the next story sent directly to your inbox.)

Vancouver architect D’Arcy Jones had never designed a multifamily project before, so when the opportunity to build a small condo came up, he was willing to tell a tiny fib to land the gig. The developers of the oddly shaped site in Victoria, British Columbia, thought it was too irregular to support much housing, even though it was zoned for it; they had their fingers crossed for four units, Jones says. So he told them he could fit five.