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Oahu’s Waikiki beach.

Oahu’s Waikiki beach.

Photographer: Douglas Peebles/Corbis Documentary RF
Pursuits
Travel

Hawaii Is Rethinking Tourism. Here’s What That Means for You

A more sustainable, less colonial experience awaits.

John De Fries still recalls fishing the waters off Waikiki Beach in Oahu as a kid in the 1960s. “Growing up, my family fishing grounds were a source of food first and recreation second,” he says. “Today they’re a playground surrounded by hotels.”

Born and raised in Waikiki, De Fries was appointed president of the Hawaii Tourism Authority in Sept. 2020, when coronavirus shutdowns had the state’s economy reeling but the community and environment thriving. In 2019, the state of 1.5 million people hosted a record 10.4 million visitors—unsustainable figures that had residents feeling sour. Though tourism netted $2.07 billion in tax revenue that year, Hawaiians lamented its effects on traffic, beaches, and the cost of living.