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Two Cleveland Houses Tell a Story of America’s Unequal Recovery

An eviction notice on Clarebird Avenue and rising home prices on Daleview Drive reflect how the pandemic is reinforcing racial inequality.

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Calais Gathings was forced to move out of her home on Clarebird Avenue in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of Cleveland (left); Nathan Hodge and Erica Schulstad paid more than the asking price for their home on Daleview Drive in the suburb of Lakewood (right).

Calais Gathings was forced to move out of her home on Clarebird Avenue in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of Cleveland (left); Nathan Hodge and Erica Schulstad paid more than the asking price for their home on Daleview Drive in the suburb of Lakewood (right).

Photographer: Da’Shaunae Marisa for Bloomberg Businessweek

From the outside, 11410 Clarebird Ave. looks like many homes in Cleveland’s Mount Pleasant neighborhood. The fading yellow siding and creaky front porch point to mild neglect. The grass in the front yard needs a trim. But on a street of aging, single-family homes in an area that for decades has been fighting a losing battle against economic decline, the three-bedroom house has a new story to tell: Calais Gathings, a nursing assistant who lost her job in the pandemic and fell behind on rent, has moved out.

A 23-minute drive away, in the leafy western suburb of Lakewood, Ohio, 17527 Daleview Drive tells a different story. Built in 1927, two years after the Clarebird home, the four-bedroom brick house with a gabled roof and neatly landscaped grounds was sold in August to newlyweds Nathan Hodge and Erica Schulstad for $319,500, more than the asking price.