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An Indian Armed Forces helicopter flies near the Khardung La pass in Ladakh, India, on Nov. 13, 2019.

An Indian Armed Forces helicopter flies near the Khardung La pass in Ladakh, India, on Nov. 13, 2019.

Photographer: Prashanth Vishwanathan/Bloomberg

India’s China Standoff Shows Risks of Getting Too Close to Trump

New Delhi’s bid to draw investment away from Beijing could backfire.

Indian and Chinese forces are facing off by a glacial lake in the Himalayas that traverses their fluid frontier. The standoff at 14,000 feet (4,270 meters) is the most visible theater of conflict between the world’s two most populous nations, but it’s far from the only source of friction.

Despite the remote location, the military buildup at the un-demarcated border at Pangong Tso lake should not be seen in isolation, but set against the backdrop of Beijing’s deteriorating international relations during the coronavirus outbreak.