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Students’ Massacre Casts Long Shadow on AMLO’s Bid to Boost Army

  • Some officers were involved in Mexico’s mass 2014 kidnapping
  • Lopez Obrador has sought to expand army’s presence in country
Demonstrators during a rally on the anniversary of the 2014 mass kidnapping of Ayotzinapa students in Mexico City, on Sept. 26.

Demonstrators during a rally on the anniversary of the 2014 mass kidnapping of Ayotzinapa students in Mexico City, on Sept. 26.

Photographer: Luis Antonio Rojas/Bloomberg
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New revelations about the role of Mexico’s military in one of the country’s most horrific massacres in recent decades is complicating President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador’s push to put the army at the center of his security strategy.

A truth commission established by the president alleged last month that an army colonel ordered the murder of six of the 43 students who went missing in 2014. Then, earlier this week, documents leaked to the press described grisly details about how a criminal group tried to get rid of the students’ bodies, suggesting troops helped hide some of their remains.