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Congo Violence Rages Despite Conflict-Mineral Law, US Says

  • Illicit trade in minerals still fueling conflict in Congo: GAO
  • Companies have improved tracing of mineral-supply chains
A woman is treated at a hospital after being seriously injured during an attack by unknown assailants in a nearby village, in Oicha, on Jan. 29, 2020. 

A woman is treated at a hospital after being seriously injured during an attack by unknown assailants in a nearby village, in Oicha, on Jan. 29, 2020. 

Photographer: Alexis Huguet/AFP/Getty Images

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Violence in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo continues to rage unabated despite US legislation aimed at stopping the mineral trade from fueling conflict, the Government Accountability Office said.

The so-called conflict-mineral law that came into effect in 2014 requires US-traded companies to investigate and disclose if their products may include gold, tin, tantalum or tungsten from Congo or its nine neighboring countries. While corporate reporting on mineral-supply chains has improved since then, the security situation in eastern Congo hasn’t, the GAO said in a report published Wednesday.