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NM City, Victim of Government Burn, Now Faces Water Shortage

Burned trees are visible on Monday, Aug. 8, 2022, in Gallinas, N.M. Earlier this year the area already endured the devastation of the state's largest fire in recorded history, caused by federal officials carrying out what was supposed to be a prescribed burn to lessen the wildfire danger. Now, those same charred lands under deluge from a powerful seasonal monsoon are channeling contaminated runoff into the city's drinking water supply. (AP Photo/Brittany Peterson)
Burned trees are visible on Monday, Aug. 8, 2022, in Gallinas, N.M. Earlier this year the area already endured the devastation of the state's largest fire in recorded history, caused by federal officials carrying out what was supposed to be a prescribed burn to lessen the wildfire danger. Now, those same charred lands under deluge from a powerful seasonal monsoon are channeling contaminated runoff into the city's drinking water supply. (AP Photo/Brittany Peterson)
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Las Vegas, N.M. (AP) -- In the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, buzzing chainsaws interrupt the serenity. Crews are hustling to remove charred trees and other debris that have been washing down the mountainsides in the wake of the largest wildfire in New Mexico's recorded history, choking rivers and streams.

Heavy equipment operators are moving boulders dislodged by the daily torrential summer rains that have followed the flames.