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Texas Schools Are Stuffed to the Max as Voters Reject Bond Sales

  • The state has dozens of fast-growing public school districts
  • Only 63% of the bond dollars on ballots in May were approved
A recently opened elementary school in Humble ISD which was built to accommodate the student enrollment growth.
A recently opened elementary school in Humble ISD which was built to accommodate the student enrollment growth.Source: Humble ISD

As superintendent of a Texas school district that’s projected to gain almost 4,000 students in the next five years, Scott Muri says his district is desperate for more classroom space.

The schools he leads in Ector County are bursting with kids, many buildings are more than a half-century old and residents keep flooding in, lured by the bustling industry and cheaper real estate of West Texas. Yet, in May, voters rejected two bond proposals totaling $398 million to build new facilities and update existing ones – forcing at least another year of cramped classrooms at a time when construction and borrowing costs have surged, making much needed improvements more expensive.