Skip to content

Review: The Good, the Bad And Jordan Peele’s ‘Nope’

This image released by Universal Pictures shows, from left, Daniel Kaluuya, Keke Palmer, and Brandon Perea in a scene from "Nope." (Universal Pictures via AP)
This image released by Universal Pictures shows, from left, Daniel Kaluuya, Keke Palmer, and Brandon Perea in a scene from "Nope." (Universal Pictures via AP)

(AP) -- A great debut in Hollywood can be a blessing and a curse. Once you knock it out of the park like Jordan Peele did with “Get Out,” which captured the zeitgeist so perfectly within the framework of a greatly entertaining thriller, home runs become the standard, not the exception.

Now three movies in, Peele is in a bit of conundrum. Audiences want to feel the same way they did with “Get Out.” But “Us” didn’t quite do it. And now “ Nope,” which has been shrouded in secrecy, hyped as Peele’s most ambitious yet and had more than a few casual filmgoers not so casually calling it their “most anticipated of the year,” is arriving under impossible expectations which aren’t exactly lessened by the fact that it’s also Peele's reunion with Daniel Kaluuya.