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Zuma-Era Graft Probe Ends But South Africa Remains ‘Broken’

  • Zondo panel highlighted rot in state firms, Zuma’s cabinet
  • Judge accused Ramaphosa of failing to speak out on corruption
Jacob Zuma sits in the dock of the High Court of Pietermaritzburg in 2018. 

Jacob Zuma sits in the dock of the High Court of Pietermaritzburg in 2018. 

Photographer: Phill Magakoe/AFP/Getty Images

Almost four years, $60 million and more than 5,000 pages of findings later, a judicial inquiry into corruption during former South African President Jacob Zuma’s rule is over. The real work of fixing a broken state and bringing those who looted more than $31 billion from the government to account has barely begun. 

The cumbersomely named Judicial Commission of Inquiry Into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector Including Organs of State laid out a web of graft that stretched from the national power and rail utilities to Zuma and his cabinet. Chief Justice Raymond Zondo, who headed the probe and submitted his final set of findings on Wednesday, recommended the prosecutions of scores of officials ranging from former heads of state companies to government ministers, and an overhaul of appointment processes and managerial controls.