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South Asia's Intense Heat Wave a 'Sign of Things to Come'

A woman covers her face with a scarf to protect from heat wave rides through a dust storm in Ahmedabad, India, Saturday, May 21, 2022. The intense heat wave sweeping through South Asia was made more likely due to climate change and it is a sign of things to come. An analysis by international scientists said that this heat wave was made 30-times more likely because of climate change, and future warming would make heat waves more common and hotter in the future. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
A woman covers her face with a scarf to protect from heat wave rides through a dust storm in Ahmedabad, India, Saturday, May 21, 2022. The intense heat wave sweeping through South Asia was made more likely due to climate change and it is a sign of things to come. An analysis by international scientists said that this heat wave was made 30-times more likely because of climate change, and future warming would make heat waves more common and hotter in the future. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
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New Delhi (AP) -- The devastating heat wave that has baked India and Pakistan in recent months was made more likely by climate change and is a glimpse of the region's future, international scientists said in a study released Monday.

The World Weather Attribution group analyzed historical weather data that suggested early, long heat waves that impact a massive geographical area are rare, once-a-century events. But the current level of global warming, caused by human-caused climate change, has made those heat waves 30 times more likely.