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Ukraine War Gives U.S. LNG Chance to Shed Fracked-Gas Stigma

Cheniere leads the way to prove it’s plugging methane leaks in hopes of new long-term contracts.

Tug boats prepare to pull out an LNG tanker at the Cheniere Sabine Pass Liquefaction facility in Cameron, Louisiana on April. 14, 2022.

Tug boats prepare to pull out an LNG tanker at the Cheniere Sabine Pass Liquefaction facility in Cameron, Louisiana on April. 14, 2022.

Photographer: Mark Felix/Bloomberg

Deep in Louisiana’s bayou country, 18 maroon canisters discharge clear, odorless methane into the air as hard-hatted engineers patrol wind gauges, solar panels and a laser surveillance system shooting beams at mirrors. 

The experts and employees of Cheniere Energy Inc., the largest U.S. exporter of natural gas, are part of a high-stakes campaign to show Europe that as it abandons Russian gas, it can substitute the American variety without fear. Their job is to find the most efficient leak detecting system.