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Readers: Join Our Photo Challenge to Explore and Reconnect to Your City

We invite readers around the world to rediscover your city and share your journey with us — in a photograph.

A new chalk mural of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson in the Eastern Market area of Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Rediscover what’s popped up in your city during the pandemic. 

A new chalk mural of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson in the Eastern Market area of Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Rediscover what’s popped up in your city during the pandemic. 

Mural artist: Chalk Riot. Photographer: Al Drago//Bloomberg.

The last two years of the pandemic have limited commuting and traveling, shrinking the boundaries of our physical worlds. As a result, some people may have lost their “sense of place,” or relationship to their cities, as streets emptied out and routines were uprooted. But the recent easing of Covid cases in some parts of the globe — however temporary or permanent — presents an opportunity for urban dwellers to reconnect with their communities, or to explore new ones.

In some places, the pandemic has reshaped entire neighborhoods and urban centers. In others, little may have changed, but our movements have shifted. We may be noticing new additions, or things we overlooked in the past — a mural or a new path, an interesting building, or a previously quiet corner now teeming with buskers and pedestrians. For frontline workers, life in public transformed with different rhythms and routes. For others who’ve stayed closer to home with remote work, venturing out may come with eye-opening surprises.