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U.S. Coal Prices Top $100 a Ton for First Time Since 2008

  • Illinois Basin prices top $109, Central Appalachia hit $106.15
  • Climate scientists warn earth is warming at dangerous pace
A bulldozer operates on a coal mound at a coal preparation plant in London, West Virginia.

A bulldozer operates on a coal mound at a coal preparation plant in London, West Virginia.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg
Updated on

U.S. coal prices topped $100 a ton for the first time in 13 years as Russia’s war in Ukraine upends international energy markets and an economic rebound from the pandemic drives up demand for fossil fuels.

Prices for coal from Central Appalachia surged 9% to $106.15 a ton last week, the highest since late 2008, according to government data released Monday. Prices in the Illinois Basin rose to $109.55, topping $100 for the first time in records dating to 2005.