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Where Mornings Would Get Darker Under Permanent Daylight Savings Time

Most Americans support eliminating the twice-annual changing of the clocks. But maps show how the daylight saving bill passed by the Senate would affect some cities more than others. 

A map showing how often the sun will rise before 7 a.m. across the U.S. under permanent daylight saving time. Darker shades indicate fewer days out of the year.

A map showing how often the sun will rise before 7 a.m. across the U.S. under permanent daylight saving time. Darker shades indicate fewer days out of the year.

Source: Andy Woodruff

Corrected

In a move that surprised even senators, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed a bill this week to nix the twice-a-year clock change and make daylight saving time permanent year-round by November 2023 (except in states and U.S. territories that currently do not observe it). The bill is headed to the House, where top Democratic leaders have indicated some support, but no specific timeline has emerged for when or if the chamber will take up the measure.

While most Americans welcome the prospect of staying on just one time setting year-round, many think Congress is abolishing the wrong one with the Sunshine Protection Act, and should make standard time permanent instead. Although the longer evening daylight hours many would enjoy under permanent daylight time provide more time to shop or go outdoors after work, there’s a tradeoff in many parts of the U.S. In some cities, people might not see the sun rise until hours after they wake up, and that comes with health and safety costs from sleep disruptions and dark commutes.