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Drought-stricken California Imposes New Round of Water Cuts

FILE — In this Aug. 22, 2021, file photo, a family walks over cracked mud near Lake Oroville's shore as water levels remain low due to continuing drought conditions in Oroville, Calif. State water officials are preparing to tell major urban and agricultural water agencies on Friday, March 18, 2022, that they'll get even less water from state supplies than the small amount they were promised at the start of the year. Lake Oroville is currently 68% of its historical average supply.(AP Photo/Ethan Swope, File)
FILE — In this Aug. 22, 2021, file photo, a family walks over cracked mud near Lake Oroville's shore as water levels remain low due to continuing drought conditions in Oroville, Calif. State water officials are preparing to tell major urban and agricultural water agencies on Friday, March 18, 2022, that they'll get even less water from state supplies than the small amount they were promised at the start of the year. Lake Oroville is currently 68% of its historical average supply.(AP Photo/Ethan Swope, File)
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Sacramento, Calif. (AP) -- California's urban water users and farmers who rely on supplies from state reservoirs will get less than planned this year as fears of a third consecutive dry year become reality, state officials announced Friday.

Water agencies that serve 27 million people and 750,000 acres (303,514 hectares) of farmland, will get just 5% of what they've requested this year from state supplies beyond what's needed for critical activities such as drinking and bathing.