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UN to Finalize Science Report on How Warming Hits Home Hard

People visit a thermometer on July 11, 2021, in Death Valley National Park, Calif. A special United Nations panel is putting the finishing touches on a major science report that's supposed to tell people the "so what?" about climate change. The report will highlight how global warming disrupts people's lives, their natural environment and Earth itself. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
People visit a thermometer on July 11, 2021, in Death Valley National Park, Calif. A special United Nations panel is putting the finishing touches on a major science report that's supposed to tell people the "so what?" about climate change. The report will highlight how global warming disrupts people's lives, their natural environment and Earth itself. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
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Berlin (AP) -- Scientists and governments met Monday to finalize a major U.N. report on how global warming disrupts people's lives, their natural environment and the Earth itself. Don’t expect a flowery valentine to the planet: instead an activist group predicted “a nightmare painted in the dry language of science.”

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a collection of hundreds of the world’s top scientists, issues three huge reports on climate change every five to seven years. The latest update, which won't be finished until the end of February, will explain how climate change already affects humans and the planet, what to expect in the future, and the risks and benefits of adapting to a warmer world.