Skip to content

All the Reasons Draghi Is Not Yet Italy’s New President

Parliamentary assistants open a ballot box during the fourth round of voting to name a new president at the Chambers of Deputies in Rome, on Jan. 27, 2022.

Parliamentary assistants open a ballot box during the fourth round of voting to name a new president at the Chambers of Deputies in Rome, on Jan. 27, 2022.

Photographer: Alessia Pierdomenico/Bloomberg
Updated on

For weeks, if not months, the question in Italy and abroad has been whether Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi will replace President Sergio Mattarella when his term ends in February. Few doubted that, if he wanted the job, he’d get it.

But after fraught talks and several rounds of voting by lawmakers, the former European Central Bank chief still hasn’t won, and the risk of instability in the euro-area’s third largest economy is growing.