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California Museum Returns Massacre Remains to Wiyot Tribe

This Dec. 21, 2010 photo provided by Aldaron Laird shows Tulawat, the site of the Indian Island Massacre, where members of the Wiyot Tribe were killed in 1860. The remains of 20 Native Americans massacred in the 1860s on the Northern California island have been returned to their tribe from a museum where they had been in storage. The tribe's historic preservation officer says the remains will be reunited with their families.  (Aldaron Laird via AP)
This Dec. 21, 2010 photo provided by Aldaron Laird shows Tulawat, the site of the Indian Island Massacre, where members of the Wiyot Tribe were killed in 1860. The remains of 20 Native Americans massacred in the 1860s on the Northern California island have been returned to their tribe from a museum where they had been in storage. The tribe's historic preservation officer says the remains will be reunited with their families.  (Aldaron Laird via AP)
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Los Angeles (AP) -- The most vulnerable members of the Wiyot Tribe were asleep the morning of Feb. 26, 1860, when a band of white men slipped into their Northern California villages under darkness and slaughtered them.

Many of the children, women and elderly slain in what became known as the Indian Island Massacre had their eternal rest disturbed when their graves were later dug up and their skeletons and the artifacts buried with them were placed in a museum.