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Maxwell Defense Rests Case Without Calling Socialite to Stand

  • Witnesses testify to Epstein’s charitable character, affection
  • Maxwell says the government hasn’t proven case beyond doubt
In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell enters the courtroom escorted by U.S. Marshalls at the start of her trial, in New York on Nov. 29.

In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell enters the courtroom escorted by U.S. Marshalls at the start of her trial, in New York on Nov. 29.

Photographer: Elizabeth Williams/AP Photo
Updated on

Ghislaine Maxwell’s defense rested after presenting two days of witnesses in her sex-trafficking trial to chip away at her accusers’ credibility and portray the socialite and her ex-boyfriend Jeffrey Epstein as good, law-abiding people.

It was a defense that sought to weaken the perception of Epstein as a sexual predator and try to distance Maxwell from the disgraced financier. Witnesses told of his donations to charity and of innocent relationships with the young daughters of family friends. They testified to the couple’s interest in “professional” massages, rather than the sexualized ones accusers said they were told to perform.