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US Study: Record Highs, Rain And Beaver Damage in Arctic

A drop of water falls off an iceberg melting in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017. According to a report by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released on Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2021, the Arctic continues to deteriorate from global warming, not setting as many records this year as in the past, but still changing so rapidly that federal scientists call it alarming. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A drop of water falls off an iceberg melting in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017. According to a report by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released on Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2021, the Arctic continues to deteriorate from global warming, not setting as many records this year as in the past, but still changing so rapidly that federal scientists call it alarming. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
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(AP) -- The Arctic continues to deteriorate from global warming, not setting as many records this year as in the past, but still changing so rapidly that federal scientists call it alarming in their annual Arctic report card.

The 16th straight health check for the northern polar region spotlighted the first ever rainfall at Greenland summit station, record warm temperatures between October and December 2020, and the new problem of expansion of beavers in the Arctic.