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Germany’s New Climate Policies Fall Short of Greens’ Promises

The new coalition government cemented a commitment to phase out coal by 2030, but didn’t deliver many detailed plans to cut emissions.

Annalena Baerbock and Robert Habeck, co-leaders of the Green Party.

Annalena Baerbock and Robert Habeck, co-leaders of the Green Party.

Photographer: Liesa Johannssen-Koppitz/Bloomberg

Climate policies unveiled by Germany’s new coalition government underscored the challenges ahead for the Greens, who won the most governing power ever with support from voters demanding more action to slow global warming.

The deal ramped up efforts — already among the most ambitious in the world — to slash greenhouse gas emissions with a faster coal exit, more renewables and a carbon price floor. But the Greens also made a major compromise: construction of gas-fired plants will be accelerated to ease the transition away from coal. That means increasing reliance on a fossil fuel that’s prone to leaking methane, a super-warming greenhouse gas.