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Jupiter's Monster Storm Not Just Wide But Surprisingly Deep

This combination of images provided by NASA on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 shows the planet Jupiter seen by the Juno probe's microwave radiometer, left, and in visible light, captured by the Gemini Observatory. The Great Red Spot, a storm so big it could swallow Earth, extends surprisingly deep beneath the planet’s cloud tops, scientists reported Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS; Kevin M. Gill; Gemini Observatory via AP)
This combination of images provided by NASA on Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021 shows the planet Jupiter seen by the Juno probe's microwave radiometer, left, and in visible light, captured by the Gemini Observatory. The Great Red Spot, a storm so big it could swallow Earth, extends surprisingly deep beneath the planet’s cloud tops, scientists reported Thursday, Oct. 28, 2021. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS; Kevin M. Gill; Gemini Observatory via AP)
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Cape Canaveral, Fla. (AP) -- Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, a storm so big it could swallow Earth, extends surprisingly deep beneath the planet’s cloud tops, scientists reported Thursday.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft has discovered that the monster storm, though shrinking, still has a depth of between 200 miles (350 kilometers) and 300 miles or so (500 kilometers.) When combined with its width of 10,000 miles (16,000 kilometers), the Great Red Spot resembles a fat pancake in new 3D images of the planet.