Skip to content

Q&A: La Nina's Back And It's Not Good for Parts of Dry West

In this Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021 file photo, County of Santa Barbara Fire Department firefighters extinguish a roadside fire next to train tracks off of the U.S. 101 highway in Goleta, Calif. On Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that a La Nina has formed, which can be bad news for parts of the parched West. It also could mean a more active Atlantic hurricane season. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
In this Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021 file photo, County of Santa Barbara Fire Department firefighters extinguish a roadside fire next to train tracks off of the U.S. 101 highway in Goleta, Calif. On Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that a La Nina has formed, which can be bad news for parts of the parched West. It also could mean a more active Atlantic hurricane season. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
Updated on

(AP) -- For the second straight year, the world heads into a new La Nina weather event. This would tend to dry out parts of an already parched and fiery American West and boost an already busy Atlantic hurricane season.

Just five months after the end of a La Nina that started in September 2020, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced a new cooling of the Pacific is underway.