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Severe Brazil Drought Reignites Debate Over Daylight Saving

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Rio De Janeiro (AP) -- Dyane Rodrigues used to enjoy strolling along Rio de Janeiro's iconic Ipanema beach after a hot summer's day. Daylight saving time meant her workday went by faster, and ended early enough for her to take in the golden sunset, the 28-year-old said from her fruit stand, a stone's throw from the seashore.

That changed in 2019, when Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro did away with the practice of changing clocks. The idea behind daylight saving time had been to make most of long summer days' natural light, delaying by one hour the time at which households switch on their lamps. But the president said daylight saving no longer made sense, as it yielded little in energy savings and forced Brazilians to commute in the dark, and many experts agreed.