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Where Will the Eviction Wave Hit? Follow the Big Landlords

With evictions expected to resume in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court order, new data points to the kinds of tenants that may face the greatest risk of housing loss. 

A row of apartment units in Houston, Texas. Houston is one of a number of cities where a few large landlords dominate the list of top eviction filers. 

A row of apartment units in Houston, Texas. Houston is one of a number of cities where a few large landlords dominate the list of top eviction filers. 

Photographer: Callahan O'Hare/Bloomberg

Evictions that have been delayed in many parts of the U.S. are likely to proceed, now that the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the federal eviction moratorium on Aug. 26.

The court told the Biden administration, for the second time this summer, that only Congress can authorize a federal ban on evictions. Yet efforts by members of Congress to prevent evictions have also come to naught. Rental assistance has been slow to arrive: Despite a pressure campaign from the White House to get $46.5 billion in emergency rental assistance to tenants, state and local leaders had spent only about $5 billion by the end of July.