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DoorDash Drivers Game Algorithm to Increase Pay

The #DeclineNow movement is testing whether workers can use a company’s software against it.

Dashers Dave Levy and Nikos Kanelopoulos at a pizza chain’s parking lot in Easton, Pa.

Dashers Dave Levy and Nikos Kanelopoulos at a pizza chain’s parking lot in Easton, Pa.

Source: Brody Ford

Dave Levy and Nikos Kanelopoulos are trying to beat the algorithm. The two DoorDash drivers—Dashers, as the company calls them—are trying to persuade their peers to turn down the lowest-paying deliveries so the automated system for matching jobs with drivers will respond by raising pay rates. “Every app-based on-demand company’s objective is to constantly shift profits from the driver back to the company,” Levy says. “Our objective is the reverse of that.”

Their main tool is #DeclineNow, a 40,000-person online forum that provides a view into a type of labor activism tailored for the gig economy. While there’s no reliable way to quantify its impact, #DeclineNow’s members say they’ve already increased pay for workers across the country, including in Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley, where Levy and Kanelopoulos live. But the effort raises difficult questions about the nature of collective action, and there are reasons to doubt whether using a company’s own software systems against it is a strategy that can prove effective for a sustained period of time.