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The Misery Behind the Truce in Ethiopia’s Civil War

Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed speaks in Ambo on April 11, 2018. 

Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed speaks in Ambo on April 11, 2018. 

Photographer: ZACHARIAS ABUBEKER/AFP
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When Abiy Ahmed’s party won a majority of seats in a mid-2021 vote and he secured a new term as Ethiopia’s prime minister, he appeared to have cemented control over Africa’s second-most-populous nation. Instead, his government was forced to declare a nationwide state of emergency as rebel fighters from the Tigray region seized strategic towns and threatened to advance on the capital, Addis Ababa, before the army staged a counter-offensive and pushed them back. More than 16 months of fighting spawned misery and hunger across the north of the country before a truce was agreed to allow for the dispersement of humanitarian aid.