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Economy

A Growing Movement Takes on the Mega-Development

Sunnyside Yard has been billed as New York City’s utopian development. Activists who opposed an Amazon HQ says there’s no such thing.

A rendering of the Sunnyside Yard shows how the development would sit on a deck over the existing rail yard. 

A rendering of the Sunnyside Yard shows how the development would sit on a deck over the existing rail yard. 

PAU

Artist Jenny Dubnau has watched with heartache over the last ten years as her beloved neighborhood of Long Island City, a riverside Queens community once dominated by small manufacturing businesses, became engulfed by a wave of luxury developments. Gone were the street cart storage facilities and stone-cutting businesses that she walked by every day on the way to her artist studio, replaced by towering glass skyscrapers just across the river from Manhattan. She expected it was only a matter of time until she, too, would be priced out. 

“All these developments were causing the rents to go so insane, so I became an anti-gentrification activist,” she said.