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Sempra’s Mexico Unit Says Power Proposal Hobbles the Sector

  • Draft proposal would make company’s expansion plans impossible
  • AMLO has pledged to review power subsidies for companies
Contractors build a lattice tower during construction of San Diego Gas & Electric Co.'s (SDG&E) Sunrise Powerlink, a 117-mile, 500-kilovolt electric transmission line that runs from Imperial county to San Diego, California, U.S., on Wednesday, April 4, 2012. SDG&E, a subsidiary of Sempra Energy, provides energy service to 3.4 million consumers through 1.4 million electric meters and more than 850,000 natural gas meters in San Diego and southern Orange counties.
Contractors build a lattice tower during construction of San Diego Gas & Electric Co.'s (SDG&E) Sunrise Powerlink, a 117-mile, 500-kilovolt electric transmission line that runs from Imperial county to San Diego, California, U.S., on Wednesday, April 4, 2012. SDG&E, a subsidiary of Sempra Energy, provides energy service to 3.4 million consumers through 1.4 million electric meters and more than 850,000 natural gas meters in San Diego and southern Orange counties.Photographer: Bloomberg/Bloomberg
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Infraestructura Energetica Nova SAB said a draft proposal by Mexico’s energy regulator to modify some transmission permits would make it impossible to supply power to new partners or carry out any expansion plans.

In a letter posted in response to the draft proposal, the Mexican subsidiary of the U.S.’s Sempra classifies it as “high regulatory impact” and argues that it violates policy that’s already in place.