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CEOs, Lawmakers Sound Alarm on Heightened Canadian Rail Protests

  • Cenovus CEO sees ‘significant risk’ to the Canadian economy
  • Prime Minister Trudeau says rule of law must be respected
A man holds a flag during a demonstration supporting the Wet’suwet’en Nation in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, near Belleville, Ontario, on Feb. 11.
A man holds a flag during a demonstration supporting the Wet’suwet’en Nation in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, near Belleville, Ontario, on Feb. 11.Photographer: Lars Hagberg/The Canadian Press via AP Photo
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Escalating protests against a Canadian natural gas pipeline are putting rail shipments of grain, propane, lumber and consumer goods in jeopardy and prompting consternation among executives and lawmakers.

Demonstrators are blocking rail lines and other key infrastructure to support parts of the Wet’suwet’en Nation, an indigenous group that opposes the construction of TC Energy Corp.’s planned C$6.6 billion ($5 billion) Coastal GasLink project. The pipeline would carry natural gas from Western Alberta to Kitimat, British Columbia, where the gas will be turned into LNG for export.