Skip to content
Subscriber Only
Business
Economics

Lebanon Turns to IMF as Fitch Sounds Alarm on Default

  • Fitch Ratings downgraded Lebanon on probable default
  • Central bank has been rationing U.S. dollars amid unrest
Saad Hariri, Lebanon's prime minister, left, speaks during a joint press conference with U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, July 25, 2017. Trump said he's disappointed with Attorney General Jeff Sessions for recusing himself from investigations of Russian interference in the 2016 election, and that "time will tell" if the nation's top law enforcement officer remains in his job.
Saad Hariri, Lebanon's prime minister, left, speaks during a joint press conference with U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, July 25, 2017. Trump said he's disappointed with Attorney General Jeff Sessions for recusing himself from investigations of Russian interference in the 2016 election, and that "time will tell" if the nation's top law enforcement officer remains in his job.Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg
Updated on

Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.

Lebanon’s caretaker Prime Minister Saad Hariri said he discussed with the heads of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank a possible plan to ease a deepening financial crisis.