Skip to content
More from
Bloomberg
Politics
relates to Thousands Begin Dispersing After Rainy Rally: Hong Kong Update
relates to Spain Rebukes Salvini, Offers to Take ‘Open Arms’ Migrants relates to Erdogan Faces Snub From Lawyers Boycotting Palace Ceremony relates to Southern Africa Leaders Call for End to Zimbabwe Sanctions relates to Hong Kong Resets Democracy Push With Peaceful Mass March in Rain relates to Kudlow Pushes Back on Recession, Says U.S.-China Calls Positive relates to Zimbabwe Police Ban Planned Protest Marches by Opposition relates to Gibraltar Says Can’t Seek Court Order Detaining Tanker for U.S. relates to Germany Says It Could Spend Extra $55 Billion If Crisis Hits relates to Singapore Must Stay Independent in U.S.-China Conflict, PM Says relates to Thousands Begin Dispersing After Rainy Rally: Hong Kong Update
relates to Spain Rebukes Salvini, Offers to Take ‘Open Arms’ Migrants relates to Erdogan Faces Snub From Lawyers Boycotting Palace Ceremony relates to Southern Africa Leaders Call for End to Zimbabwe Sanctions relates to Hong Kong Resets Democracy Push With Peaceful Mass March in Rain relates to Kudlow Pushes Back on Recession, Says U.S.-China Calls Positive relates to Zimbabwe Police Ban Planned Protest Marches by Opposition relates to Gibraltar Says Can’t Seek Court Order Detaining Tanker for U.S. relates to Germany Says It Could Spend Extra $55 Billion If Crisis Hits relates to Singapore Must Stay Independent in U.S.-China Conflict, PM Says relates to Thousands Begin Dispersing After Rainy Rally: Hong Kong Update
relates to Spain Rebukes Salvini, Offers to Take ‘Open Arms’ Migrants relates to Erdogan Faces Snub From Lawyers Boycotting Palace Ceremony relates to Southern Africa Leaders Call for End to Zimbabwe Sanctions relates to Hong Kong Resets Democracy Push With Peaceful Mass March in Rain relates to Kudlow Pushes Back on Recession, Says U.S.-China Calls Positive relates to Zimbabwe Police Ban Planned Protest Marches by Opposition relates to Gibraltar Says Can’t Seek Court Order Detaining Tanker for U.S. relates to Germany Says It Could Spend Extra $55 Billion If Crisis Hits relates to Singapore Must Stay Independent in U.S.-China Conflict, PM Says
politics

What Is the Hatch Act? Here’s What the Law Does and Doesn’t Allow

What Is the Hatch Act? Here’s What the Law Does and Doesn’t Allow

Kellyanne Conway, senior adviser to President Donald Trump, speaks to the media in the briefing room of the the White House in Washington on Feb. 1, 2019.

Kellyanne Conway, senior adviser to President Donald Trump, speaks to the media in the briefing room of the the White House in Washington on Feb. 1, 2019.

Photographer: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg
Kellyanne Conway, senior adviser to President Donald Trump, speaks to the media in the briefing room of the the White House in Washington on Feb. 1, 2019.
Photographer: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg

Washington (AP) -- A federal watchdog agency says Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Donald Trump, has repeatedly violated a law known as the Hatch Act that limits political activity by federal workers. The U.S. Office of Special Counsel recommended her firing while the White House called the independent agency's actions "unprecedented" and "deeply flawed."

More information about the Hatch Act:

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE HATCH ACT?

Congress approved the Hatch Act in 1939 to limit partisan activity by federal employees to ensure the government functions fairly and effectively.

WHAT ACTIVITIES ARE PROHIBITED?

Running for office in partisan elections, sending or forwarding a partisan political email while on duty or in a federal workplace, engaging in political activity while wearing an official uniform or while using a government vehicle, using official authority to interfere with or influence an election, soliciting or receiving political contributions, wearing or displaying partisan political buttons, T-shirts or signs.

WHAT ACTIVITIES ARE ALLOWED?

Voting however one chooses, contributing money to campaigns or political parties, attending political rallies and meetings, expressing opinions about candidates and issues. If the activity is directed at the success or failure of a party or candidate, then the expression is not permitted while the employee is on duty.

WHO IS COVERED BY THE HATCH ACT?

All civilian employees in the executive branch of the federal government, except the president and the vice president.

ARE THERE EXCEPTIONS?

Certain executive officials, such as presidential advisers or cabinet officers, can engage in political activities during official working time as long as federal funds are not used. Any such official must reimburse the U.S. Treasury for federal resources used in campaign activities.

WHAT SANCTIONS OCCUR FOR VIOLATIONS?

Career government officials found to have violated the Hatch Act can be fired, suspended or demoted, and fined up to $1,000.