Skip to content
CityLab
Perspective

What the Mutual Admiration Among Jews and Muslims in the U.S. Reveals

A Muslim-American former state department officer analyzes a new poll and finds fertile ground for officials to engage faith groups before tragedy strikes.
The Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom, which brings together Jewish and Muslim women interested in learning about one another, toured civil rights sites in Selma, Alabama, in 2018.
The Sisterhood of Salaam Shalom, which brings together Jewish and Muslim women interested in learning about one another, toured civil rights sites in Selma, Alabama, in 2018.Brynn Anderson/AP

America is facing a civic health crisis. According to a new report released today by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU), only one third of Americans communicated directly with their locally elected representatives in the last year, and only 31 percent of Americans communicated with their congressional representatives in that same span.

The numbers are worse for Americans of Muslim faith even as they are increasingly singled out for hate crimes and discrimination. Only 20 percent of American Muslims report that they met or communicated with their local government representatives and only 17 percent did so with their congressional representatives in the past year, according to ISPU’s poll.