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Bashir's Old Guard Jockeys for Power as Sudan's Protests Rage On

  • Militia, spy and army chiefs at odds after al-Bashir’s ouster
  • Splits emerge in opposition as they submit demands to military
Young Sudanese sit atop a military vehicle as they celebrate the end of Omar al-Bashir’s regime on April 13.
Young Sudanese sit atop a military vehicle as they celebrate the end of Omar al-Bashir’s regime on April 13.Photographer: Ahmed Mustafa/AFP/Getty Images
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Sudanese pro-democracy protesters won further concessions from the army that overthrew President Omar al-Bashir, as upheaval in the ruling military council signals a power struggle among the remnants of his 30-year regime.

Since taking control on April 11, the council has canceled its curfew, freed prisoners, changed leadership and vowed to review laws that brought trials for perceived indecency or apostasy, all in response to mass protests. Yet it hasn’t budged on the key opposition demand of an immediate handover to civilians -- insisting on retaining power for as long as two years -- and named as its deputy head Mohamed Hamdan, the chief of a powerful militia accused of rights abuses.