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Tate Modern Visitors Can Keep Looking Into Rich People’s Condos, Legally

The decision by the British High Court was an abrupt end to a heavily publicized stand-off between private wealth and a public art institution.
The Tate Modern's Blavatnik Building, whose top floor viewing gallery overlooks the Neo Bankside development, pictured left.
The Tate Modern's Blavatnik Building, whose top floor viewing gallery overlooks the Neo Bankside development, pictured left.Matt Dunham/AP

Luxury flat owners who feel their privacy is invaded by a public viewing platform at London’s Tate Modern have only themselves to blame.

So said a judge at the British High Court Tuesday, at the end of a two-year-long court battle between the world's most visited modern art gallery and residents of a condo development that overlooks it. Since opening as an extension in 2016, Tate Modern’s eye-catching Herzog + De Meuron-designed Blavatnik Building has become famous for its top floor, daytime-only viewing gallery. It’s well-known not because of its impressive panorama of London landmarks, but for the unusually intimate views it offers in through the windows of a luxury residential complex called Neo Bankside, which lies directly opposite.