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Economy

Philadelphia Could Be Next To Provide Lawyers For Low-Income Tenants

A new report shows that by investing in representation for low-income tenants facing eviction, the city could save more than $45 million.
A foreclosure notice on a home in Cincinnati, Ohio, a city with one of the highest eviction rates in the United States.
A foreclosure notice on a home in Cincinnati, Ohio, a city with one of the highest eviction rates in the United States.John Sommers II/Reuters

Landlord-tenant court is a notoriously nasty place. In New York, for example, housing court has become a tool of landlords trying to push out rent-controlled tenants. In Philadelphia, one out of every 14 tenants faces eviction every year, and those fights play out in housing court.

Those legal battles are costly for the city, and often confusing for tenants who don’t always know the law and procedures, and struggle to keep up with the jargon. Low-income tenants especially face difficulties since they cannot afford lawyers.