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London’s Latest Bit of Rail Infrastructure Is a Very Old Street

After a revamp, a tunneled Victorian thoroughfare has become part of London Bridge Station.
Local schoolchildren at the re-opening of Stainer Street, in London Bridge Station
Local schoolchildren at the re-opening of Stainer Street, in London Bridge StationNetwork Rail

This month, one of the world’s oldest surviving railway terminuses acquired an unusual new component: an entire Victorian street.

Stainer Street, a road that used to run beneath London Bridge Station, which has served the U.K. capital since 1836, is reopening this week along with the revamped station above it. It’s a surprisingly elegant pedestrian walkway that runs parallel to the station’s main concourse. This final finishing touch is emblematic of the way the terminus, which first started service in May, has been reconstructed. Thanks to the rebuild, London has a properly contemporary, easily navigable railway hub that manages to knit itself seamlessly into an urban fabric that is both historic and chaotic.