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Yamasaki's Regret

The architect became progressively self-critical over the spectacular failure of Pruitt-Igoe, the St. Louis housing project he designed. The time is right to reevaluate his work and its place in the history of 20th-century architecture.
Besides his two most infamous projects, Pruitt-Igoe and the World Trade Center, Yamasaki’s work struck a chord with the public and remains popular today, demonstrating that the humanistic principles he believed in were indeed valid.
Besides his two most infamous projects, Pruitt-Igoe and the World Trade Center, Yamasaki’s work struck a chord with the public and remains popular today, demonstrating that the humanistic principles he believed in were indeed valid.Minoru Yamasaki and Associates, U.S. Science Pavilion, Century 21 Exposition (Seattle, 1959–62). Archives of Michigan

The following is an excerpt from Minoru Yamasaki: Humanist Architecture for a Modernist World (Yale University Press):

By the late 1970s, Minoru Yamasaki had fallen out of the limelight. None of his foreign designs would be published in American architecture journals. A review of his firm’s project list reveals that in Yamasaki’s last years, nearly a quarter of Minoru Yamasaki Associate’s (MYA) commissions were from three locations: Hawaii, Seattle, and his home of Troy, Michigan. The few buildings that eventually were constructed in these places were difficult to distinguish as Yamasaki’s, indicating his diminishing role in the design process. MYA’s work gradually lost the distinctive personality that characterized its best buildings of the 1950s and ‘60s.