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CityLab
Economy

Do Two-Way Streets Help a City's Economy?

There’s more than one way for neighborhoods to respond to two-way street conversions, new research suggests.
One-way signs in the financial district in New York City
One-way signs in the financial district in New York CityMark Lennihan/AP

Urbanists and city planners have been on a crusade against one-way streets for years. Around the country, cities have been converting one-way streets into two-way streets in light of evidence that they make traffic safer by reducing collisions for drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians; reduce crime by decreasing auto theft and robberies; and bolster neighborhood commercial districts by raising property values and increasing visibility for businesses.

But do two-way streets really affect the conditions of surrounding areas? Do they spur more jobs and better economic health?