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The Latest: Lawmaker: Simon's Resignation 'Important Step'

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Larry Nassar appears in court on Jan. 16.

Photographer: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Lansing, Mich. (AP) -- The Latest on the sentencing of Michigan sports doctor Larry Nassar and other developments in the case (all times local):

9:30 p.m.

Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon's resignation is being welcomed in the Legislature, where pressure had been building for her to step down or be ousted by the university's board of trustees.

Sen. Curtis Hertel Jr., a Democrat from East Lansing, where the campus is located, called it "an important step in moving the university forward." He says a culture needs to be created at Michigan State "where survivors are listened to and believed."

Simon is stepping down in the wake of a scandal involving Larry Nassar, who worked at Michigan State as a medical doctor. Nassar was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison for molesting young girls and women under the guise of medical treatment. Many of the victims accused the university of mishandling past complaints about Nassar.

Hertel, a Michigan State graduate, says Simon's "actions did not meet the leadership that we need at Michigan State" and that further investigating needs to be done to determine who "had reports and didn't act" beyond the president's office.

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9 p.m.

Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon has announced that she is resigning.

Simon is stepping down in the wake of a scandal involving Larry Nassar, who worked at Michigan State as a medical doctor. Nassar was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison for molesting young girls and women under the guise of medical treatment.

Many of the victims accused the university of mishandling past complaints about Nassar.

In her resignation letter, Simon said as tragedies are politicized, blame is inevitable. She acknowledged she was a natural focus of the anger as president.

Simon, who earned her doctorate at Michigan State in 1974, was promoted to school president in 2005.

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8:30 p.m.

A person familiar with the situation says Michigan State President Lou Anna Simon will resign on Thursday.

The person spoke Wednesday night to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the resignation hadn't been announced.

Simon is stepping down in the wake of a scandal involving Larry Nassar, who worked at Michigan State as a medical doctor. Nassar was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison for molesting young girls and women under the guise of medical treatment.

Many of the victims accused the university of mishandling past complaints about Nassar.

Simon, who earned her doctorate at Michigan State in 1974, was promoted to school president in 2005 .

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By Associated Press Sports Writer Larry Lage in East Lansing.

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5:40 p.m.

Another member of Michigan State University's governing board is calling for school President Lou Anna Simon to resign over criticism that the university mishandled complaints that former campus doctor Larry Nassar was sexually assaulting athletes.

Dianne Byrum on Wednesday became the second of the university's eight trustees to support her resignation. Nassar worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians. He was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison for molestation allegations.

She says in a statement that it is "clear that the public has lost confidence" in Michigan State's administration, and "changes are needed to move the university forward."

Byrum also says she is "disgusted" by comments from fellow trustee Joel Ferguson, who apologized Tuesday for saying there is a lot more going on at the university than "this Nassar thing."

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4:30 p.m.

Michigan lawmakers have voted overwhelmingly for a resolution seeking the ouster of Michigan State University's president over allegations that the school missed chances to stop sports doctor Larry Nassar from sexually assaulting girls and women.

The state House approved the nonbinding measure hours after Nassar was sentenced Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison. Nassar worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

The resolution says legislators have "lost confidence" in President Lou Anna Simon's ability to lead a transparent investigation, to implement changes, to protect students and to lead the university. It calls for her to resign or be fired by Michigan State's governing board.

The board so far has stood behind Simon, while awaiting a review by Michigan's attorney general.

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4:10 p.m.

Michigan State University says Larry Nassar's prison sentence is an "important step toward justice."

Nassar was a sports doctor whose reputation in the gymnastics world brought many young elite gymnasts to his campus office. He admits sexually molesting them with his hands.

Michigan State spokesman Jason Cody says the crimes were "horrific and repugnant." Nassar was sentenced to at least 40 years in prison Wednesday.

The Michigan attorney general plans to investigate how Michigan State handled years of allegations against Nassar. Critics have called for President Lou Anna Simon to resign.

The NCAA is conducting its own review.

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3:10 p.m.

A seven-day hearing for a Michigan sports doctor ended with tears, hugs and applause after he was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for molestation allegations.

Kyle Stephens grew up as a friend of Larry Nassar's family and was the first victim to testify in court last year. She was glad to attend the sentencing and called it a "once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to watch my monster be put away."

Nassar was sentenced Wednesday for molesting girls and young women at his Lansing-area home and his Michigan State University office. But the judge heard days of statements from more than 150 women and girls who said the abuse happened around the world.

Kaylee Lorincz was one of the last to speak in court. She later said she'd been crying all day but felt "so happy."

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2:45 p.m.

The CEO of the U.S. Olympic Committee has announced an independent investigation intended to determine how the sexual abuse attributed to former USA Gymnastics sports doctor Larry Nassar could have gone on as long as it did.

Scott Blackmun said the third-party investigation will attempt to determine "who knew what and when" when it comes to Nassar.

Nassar on Wednesday was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for molesting women and girls under the guise of medical treatment.

Blackmun praised the recent resignations of three USA Gymnastics board members, but said all current directors in the organization must also step down.

Blackmun said the U.S. Olympic Committee is "incredibly sorry" and did not ensure that the girls and young women were not given a safe opportunity to pursue their dreams.

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2:25 p.m.

The judge who handled the case of disgraced sports doctor Larry Nassar is calling for an investigation of how years of allegations against him were handled.

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina says "justice requires more" than what she can do. She sentenced Nassar to 40 to 175 years in prison Wednesday for sexually assaulting girls and young women. He worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette last week accepted Michigan State's request to investigate how the school handled complaints about Nassar. Michigan State said a "review is needed to answer questions that persist."

Many victims say they reported Nassar's abuse to various members of university staff. Michigan State said campus police got its first report in 2014. The Ingham County prosecutor declined to file charges.

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2 p.m.

The president and CEO of USA Gymnastics is applauding a judge for giving Michigan sports doctor Larry Nassar the maximum sentence of up to 175 years in prison for sexually assaulting gymnasts and other young women and girls.

Kerry Perry says Nassar's behavior was "horrific." She praised the courage of more than 150 accusers who testified or had statements read at his sentencing hearing. She says she's "profoundly saddened" they were hurt.

Nassar was a doctor at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians. He admitted molesting girls and young women under the guise of treatment for sports injuries. Judge Rosemarie Aquilina sentenced Nassar on Wednesday to 45 to 175 years in prison.

Perry says she's committed "to focus each and every day on our organization's highest priority - the safety, health and well-being of our athletes."

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1:10 p.m.

The judge who sentenced a Michigan sports doctor to decades in prison read a letter that raises questions about whether he's truly remorseful.

A courtroom packed with victims gasped Wednesday as Judge Rosemarie Aquilina read Larry Nassar's letter, which was written before the seven-day sentencing hearing.

The letter stated, "Hell hath no fury than a woman scorned" and said that "stories are being fabricated" by victims.

After reading the letter, the judge asked Nassar whether he wanted to withdraw his guilty plea. He declined.

Moments earlier, Nassar said the testimony of more than 150 accusers has "shaken me to my core." He was a doctor at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Nassar admitted molesting girls and young women with his hands under the guise of treatment for sports injuries.

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12:50 p.m.

A judge has told a Michigan sports doctor accused of sexually assaulting women and girls, "I just signed your death warrant."

The remarks from Judge Rosemarie Aquilina came as she sentenced Larry Nassar to 40 to 175 years in prison.

The sentence capped a remarkable seven-day hearing that brought more than 150 victims or their families to court, including Olympians.

They made riveting statements while confronting Nassar in a Lansing, Michigan, courtroom. He worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Nassar had pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting seven females in the Lansing area between 1998 and 2015, but the hearing was open to all of his accusers.

His accusers said he would molest them while they were on a table seeking help for various injuries. Nassar also has a 60-year prison sentence for child pornography crimes.

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12:40 p.m.

A Michigan sports doctor has been sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for sexually assaulting gymnasts and other young women and girls, capping a remarkable seven-day hearing that brought more than 150 victims or their families to court, including Olympians.

They made riveting statements while confronting Larry Nassar in a Lansing, Michigan, courtroom. He worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina sentenced Nassar on Wednesday. He had pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting seven females in the Lansing area between 1998 and 2015, but the hearing was open to all of his accusers.

His accusers said he would molest them while they were on a table seeking help for various injuries. Nassar also has a 60-year prison sentence for child pornography crimes.

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12:10 p.m.

Michigan sports doctor Larry Nassar has told his sexual assault victims that "no words" can describe how sorry he is for his crimes.

Nassar turned to the courtroom gallery to make a brief statement before his sentence Wednesday. He says the testimony of more than 150 victims since last week has "shaken me to my core."

He said, "I will carry your words with me for the rest of my days" as many of his accusers openly wept.

Nassar faces a minimum prison term of 25 to 40 years. He worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Defense attorney Matt Newburg says Nassar's "soul is broken."

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11:55 a.m.

A Michigan prosecutor calls sports doctor Larry Nassar "possibly the most prolific serial child sex abuser in history."

The comments from prosecutor Angela Povilaitis came as a judge in Lansing, Michigan, is poised to send Nassar to prison for molesting gymnasts and other girls for years. More than 150 women and girls have testified or had statements read in court since last week.

Povilaitis says adults must start believing children and young people who report abuse, no matter who the alleged perpetrator is.

She says Nassar "perfected a built-in excuse and defense" as a doctor. But she says he was actually "performing hocus-pocus medicine."

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11:40 a.m.

A Michigan prosecutor says the "breadth and ripple" of sports doctor Larry Nassar's sexual abuse is "nearly infinite."

A judge in Lansing, Michigan, is poised to send Nassar to prison for molesting gymnasts and other girls for years. More than 150 women and girls have testified or had statements read in court since last week.

Prosecutor Angela Povilaitis says Nassar found competitive gymnastics to be a "perfect place" for his crimes because victims saw him as a "god" in the sport.

Nassar faces a minimum prison term of 25 to 40 years.

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11 a.m.

The last witness to speak at the sentencing hearing for a Michigan sports doctor accused of sexually assaulting women and girls is a Kentucky lawyer who stepped forward in 2016 after USA Gymnastics was accused of mishandling complaints.

Rachael Denhollander says Larry Nassar groped, fondled and penetrated her with his hands when she was a 15-year-old gymnast in Michigan. Denhollander's statements to Michigan State University police put the criminal investigation in high gear in

2016.

Denhollander said Wednesday that she did it "because it was right." She told Nassar in court, "You have become a man ruled by selfish and perverted desires." He worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Nassar faces a minimum prison term of 25 to 40 years.

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10:30 a.m.

A judge says a Michigan sports doctor who sexually assaulted young gymnasts and other girls will "be in darkness the rest of his life."

Judge Rosemarie Aquilina made the remark Wednesday as Larry Nassar's sentencing hearing entered a seventh and final day in Lansing, Michigan. The judge is listening to a few more victims before she sends him to prison.

Sterling Riethman told Nassar that he created an "army of warrior women" with no "white flag to wave."

Nassar faces a minimum prison term of 25 to 40 years. He pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting seven people with his hands, but the hearing has been open to all of his accusers. More than 150 women and girls have given statements or had them read by others.

Nassar worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

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12:55 a.m.

A judge is poised to send Larry Nassar to prison after listening to days of testimony from women and girls who say they were sexually assaulted by the Michigan sports doctor.

More than 150 victims have appeared in court in Lansing, Michigan, or had their statements read by others since last week. Judge Rosemarie Aquilina will hear a few more Wednesday before sentencing Nassar. He worked at Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians.

Nassar faces a minimum prison term of 25 to 40 years. He pleaded guilty to assaulting seven people, but the hearing has been open to anyone who said they were a victim.

They said Nassar would use his ungloved hands to penetrate them while they were seeking treatment for various injuries.

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