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Economy

The Impacts of Segregation on Discrimination in America

A new nationwide poll shows that African Americans are more often feeling discrimination not in suburbs but in urban neighborhoods.
Protesters decrying hatred and racism converged around the country the day after a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.
Protesters decrying hatred and racism converged around the country the day after a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Damian Dovarganes/AP

The findings of a comprehensive survey on American discrimination conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health has revealed several interesting and not-so-interesting observations so far. There’s the Wait, what?! findings that more than half of white Americans believe that discrimination exists against white Americans. And there’s the Wait, that’s news? findings that majorities of African Americans said they or their family members have been discriminated against when applying for jobs or pursuing housing.

There are also some illuminating nuggets that haven’t yet surfaced in the top-line findings of the poll.