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How Baltimore Removed Its Confederate Monuments Overnight

For a city dogged by violence and unrest, this was a big deal.
The site of the Confederate Women's Monument in North Baltimore. The statue, and three others, were removed overnight.
The site of the Confederate Women's Monument in North Baltimore. The statue, and three others, were removed overnight. David Dudley/CityLab

Early this morning, a small crowd of joggers stood at the polished granite base of a statue that wasn’t there, a monument to the women of the Confederacy.

It had been in the middle of a small park across from Johns Hopkins University since 1916. Last night a crew of contractors dispatched by the city pulled it up and trucked it away, along with two other Jim Crow-era memorials and a statue of Roger B. Taney, the Maryland-born Chief Justice who authored the 1857 Dred Scott decision. The elaborate operation went off without a hitch overnight. Most Baltimoreans woke up to the news that a long-simmering controversy over the racially inflammatory artifacts was simply over.