The Latest: Israel Gives Police Free Hand on Shrine Security

Jerusalem (AP) -- The Latest on developments in Israel (all times local):

1:50 a.m.

The United Nations says Secretary-General Antonio Guterres "deeply deplores" the death of three Palestinians in clashes with Israeli security forces and urges Israeli and Palestinian leaders to refrain from actions that could further escalate the volatile situation in Jerusalem's Old City.

U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said Guterres also calls on all political, religious and community leaders "to help reduce tension."

Escalating Israeli-Palestinian tensions over the Holy Land's most contested shrine boiled over into violence on Friday that killed three Palestinians in street clashes in Jerusalem. Police say a Palestinian attacker also killed three Israelis at a West Bank settlement.

Haq said "the secretary-general reiterates that the sanctity of religious sites should be respected as places for reflection, not violence."

He said Guterres calls for the killings of the Palestinians "to be fully investigated."

___

11:20 p.m.

Israel's rescue service says a third Israeli has died of wounds sustained when a Palestinian sneaked into a home in a West Bank settlement and attacked four people with a knife.

Eli Bin, the head of Israel's rescue service MDA, told Israeli media that a total of three of those wounded died in the attack on Friday night.

Israel's military said the attack happened in Halamish, northwest of Ramallah. Israeli media reported that the Palestinian attacker was shot and wounded and also taken to hospital.

The violence came at the end of a day of deadly clashes over tensions at a major Jerusalem shrine that left three Palestinians dead.

___

10:45 p.m.

Israel says a Palestinian has carried out a stabbing attack inside an Israeli settlement in the West Bank, and that two of the wounded have died of their wounds.

Israeli news site Ynet said the Palestinian stabbed and critically wounded a woman in her 70s, and seriously wounded a man in his 30s and woman in her 60s after infiltrating a house in the Halamish settlement on Friday night.

Eli Bin, the head of Israel's rescue service MDA told Israeli Radio that two of those wounded have died.

The violence came at the end of a day of deadly clashes over tensions at a major Jerusalem shrine.

Including Friday's violence, Palestinians have killed 47 Israelis, two visiting Americans and a British tourist in stabbings, shootings and car-ramming attacks against civilians and soldiers.

During that period, Israeli forces have killed more than 255 Palestinians, most of them said by Israel to be attackers.

Israel blames the violence on incitement by Palestinian political and religious leaders. Palestinians say the attacks stem from anger over decades of Israeli rule in territories they claim.

___

10:40 p.m.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas says the Palestinian leadership will "freeze contacts" with Israel "on all levels."

Abbas made the announcement during a meeting late Friday with senior Palestinian officials to discuss the growing escalation over a major Jerusalem shrine.

It was not immediately clear if this means the Palestinians are halting their long-standing security coordination with Israel.

Three Palestinians were killed and dozens hospitalized in clashes in Jerusalem and the West Bank earlier Friday. The protests were triggered by Israel's installation of metal detectors at the shrine, revered by Muslims and Jews.

Muslim leaders allege Israel is trying to encroach on Muslim rights at the shrine, a claim Israel denies. Israel installed the metal detectors after a deadly attack by Arab gunmen who killed two Israeli policemen.

___

9:50 p.m.

The United Nations is calling for a de-escalation of violence and tensions a key Jerusalem holy site.

U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq told reporters on Friday that "ultimately, what is important is for all of the people at the holy sites, including all the worshippers at the holy sites, to feel that their religious liberties are being respected."

He said the issue is complex and "we do understand legitimate security concerns, but on the other hand it is important that the status quo at the site by retained."

Haq said the U.N. wants "all sides to avoid further steps that could lead to violence that could lead to further tensions.

He says: "We want the parties to be able to deal with it and to de-escalate the situation so that there is no threat to anyone there."

___

9 p.m.

Egypt has called for an immediate halt to the violence underway around a holy site in Jerusalem, urging Israel to show respect for Muslim sacred sites and accusing it of fomenting tensions.

A Foreign Ministry statement expresses concern over the clashes underway in Jerusalem on Friday and condemns Israel for the civilian deaths and what it describes as "excessive use of force."

Egypt further accused Israel of imposing restrictions on Palestinians when it comes to their rights to practice their faith, "fueling tension among the Palestinian people and the entire Muslim nation."

It called upon the Israeli government go be rational and not to "let the situation get into a dangerous swamp" that endangers attempts to revive peace talks.

___

7:20 p.m.

The Red Crescent says 390 Palestinians have been hurt in clashes with Israeli forces over Israel-imposed metal detectors at a Jerusalem shrine.

Palestinian officials also say three Palestinians were killed in the violence on Friday.

The Red Crescent says that while the majority of the Palestinians suffered tear gas inhalation, 38 were treated for injuries from live fire and rubber bullets in Jerusalem. It says another 66 were hospitalized in the West Bank for injuries sustained from the munitions.

Israeli police said five officers were wounded.

The clashes erupted after Muslim prayers in protest after Israel this week set up metal detectors at entrances to a sensitive shrine, holy to both Jews and Muslims, following a deadly Palestinian attack there that killed two police officers a week ago.

Palestinians view the measure as Israel cementing control. Israel denies the allegation, insisting the detectors are meant to prevent future attacks.

___

6:55 p.m.

Thousands of Yemenis, mostly supporters of the country's Shiite Houthi rebels who are at war with the internationally recognized government, have rallied in support of Palestinians clashing with Israeli troops in Jerusalem.

The demonstration took place in the Yemeni capital of Sanaa on Friday, with the protesters chanting anti-Israeli and anti-American slogans.

They converged on Sanaa's main boulevard, the 60th Street. Many held signs that read what has become known as the Houthis' calling card: "God is great; death to America; death to Israel; damn the Jews; victory to Islam." A number of men in uniforms carried the Yemeni flag.

Houthis, who seized Sanaa in 2014, are accused of acting as an Iranian proxy, much similar to the Lebanese militant Hezbollah group.

A Saudi-led coalition, backing the internationally-recognized Yemeni government, has been waging an air campaign against the Houthis for the past two years. The coalition has dislodged them from southern Yemen but they still control much of the northern region.

___

5:45 p.m.

The Palestinian Health Ministry says three Palestinians have died so far in the day's confrontations with Israeli forces over security measures at a major Jerusalem shrine.

The clashes are still underway.

The ministry did not elaborate on the identity of the latest fatality or the circumstances of the death. Hospital officials said earlier that two Palestinians were killed in clashes with Israeli forces on Friday.

Israeli police say they are investigating.

The clashes erupted in Jerusalem and the West Bank after Israel set up metal detectors at entrances to a sensitive shrine, holy to both Jews and Muslims, after a deadly attack there killed two police officers.

Palestinians view the measure as Israel expanding control over the site. Israel strongly denies the allegation, insisting it is to prevent further attacks.

___

5:05 p.m.

A Jerusalem hospital spokeswoman says a Palestinian has been killed by live fire during confrontations with Israeli police in the city.

Bayan Baidoun of Mukassed Hospital says this brings to two the number of Palestinians killed on Friday.

The Palestinian Red Crescent says 41 Palestinians were taken to hospitals or clinics with injures from live fire, rubber bullets and beatings. About 150 Palestinians were treated for tear gas inhalation.

The unrest in Jerusalem and the West Bank was triggered by an escalating Israeli-Palestinian dispute over Israel's decision to install metal detectors at a contested Jerusalem shrine. Muslims say Israel's step, taken after a deadly Palestinian attack, is an attempt to encroach on Muslim rights at the site.

Israel has denied the claim.

___

4:45 p.m.

Turkey's prime minister says the country is in dialogue with Israel to end a crisis surrounding a holy shrine revered by Muslims and Jews.

Speaking in Ankara after Friday prayers, Binali Yildirim said worship at the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem would be made difficult if each person is searched at entry.

Israel installed the metal detectors after three Israeli Arab gunmen attack from the shrine last week, killing two Israeli policemen.

Yildirim called the precautions "radical," saying limits imposed on Muslim prayers would not contribute to a solution. He said that "our suggestion to Israel is this practice is wrong" and another precaution should be developed.

In Istanbul, hundreds of protesters gathered after Friday prayers, waving Palestinian flags. An ultranationalist group also met outside a synagogue in Istanbul Thursday where some threw rocks at its gate.

___

4:10 p.m.

Israel's military says thousands of Palestinians have clashed with Israeli forces in the West Bank while the Palestinian Health Ministry says a teenager was shot and killed in Jerusalem.

The military says 3,000 attended several protests on Friday over Israel-imposed metal detectors at a contested Jerusalem holy place. Palestinians rolled burning tires and threw stones at forces who responded with tear gas and rubber bullets.

The Palestinian Health Ministry says the teen died in Jerusalem but circumstances of his death are unclear. It says the 17-year-old was killed near scene of clashes between Palestinians and Israeli police. Police are investigating.

It said 4 officers were injured from Palestinians throwing stones and launching fireworks at several protests.

Palestinians are outraged over the metal detectors Israel set near a site holy to both Jews and Muslims following a deadly Palestinian attack there last week.

___

2:20 p.m.

Israeli police have clashed with Palestinians in Jerusalem after Muslim prayers were held in protest outside a major shrine.

Associated Press footage shows police throwing stun grenades to disperse protesters in Ras al-Amud, a neighborhood in city's east. An officer can be seen kicking a man as he kneels on a mat.

Police said Palestinians threw stones at officers.

Hundreds prayed at the shrine compound, sacred to both Muslims and Jews, police said. Friday prayers typically draw tens of thousands.

Israel installed metal detectors at gates to the site after Palestinian gunmen killed two policemen there last week.

Palestinian Muslim leaders claim the devices are an Israeli attempt to expand control over the site.

Prayers have been held in the streets in protest. Israel denies the allegations saying the devices are to prevent more attacks.

Sporadic scuffles erupted elsewhere in Jerusalem.

___

1:25 p.m.

The top Muslim cleric in Jerusalem is leading hundreds of worshippers in protest prayers in the streets near a contested shrine, saying the faithful must not enter it until Israel has removed metal detectors from its gates.

Mohammed Hussein spoke Friday near the shrine, which is revered by Muslims and Jews. He told the crowd that "this is going to be a long test of wills."

Earlier this week, Israel installed metal detectors at the gates of the walled site, after Palestinians killed two Israeli policemen there in a shooting attack. Muslims demanded the removal of the detectors, alleging they are part of an Israeli attempt to expand its control over the Muslim-administered site.

Israel has denied this and said the metal detectors will remain in place.

___

11:30 a.m.

Israeli police say metal detectors will remain in place at a contested Jerusalem shrine, but suggested police may at times choose to only conduct spot checks.

The detectors were installed at the shrine earlier this week, after Palestinian gunmen carried out a deadly attack there.

Muslim leaders allege the metal detectors are part of a purported Israeli plan to expand its control over the Muslim-administered site that is also revered by Jews. Israel denies this.

On Friday, the metal detectors remained in place.

Police spokeswoman Luba Samri says "Israeli police can decide on the level of checks," suggesting spot checks are a possibility.

At Lion's Gate, one of the flashpoints, an officer told worshippers Friday they wouldn't be checked ahead of noon prayers, an offer they rejected.

___

11:15 a.m.

A senior Palestinian official says Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has asked the United States to "intervene urgently" and compel Israel to remove metal detectors from a contested Jerusalem shrine.

Nabil Abu Rdeneh said Friday that Abbas discussed the growing tensions in Jerusalem in a phone call with Trump's top adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Abu Rdeneh says Abbas told Kushner that the situation is "extremely dangerous and may go out of control" unless Israel removes the metal detectors.

Israeli police installed the metal detectors at gates to the shrine, revered by Muslims and Jews, after Palestinians carried out a deadly attack from there. Muslim leaders have called for protest, alleging that the security measures are part of a purported Israeli campaign to expand its control over the site.

___

10:35 a.m.

Israeli security forces have set up a series of checkpoints to restrict access to Jerusalem's Old City, where Muslim leaders have called for protests at a contested shrine.

Police announced that Muslim men under the age of 50 are banned from the site Friday.

Typically, tens of thousands of Muslims from Jerusalem, the West Bank and Israel converge on the shrine for Friday prayers.

On Friday, Palestinians below 50 were turned away at Israeli checkpoints between the West Bank and Jerusalem. An Arab lawmaker in Israel's parliament says he and fellow Arab citizens were stopped by police on the outskirts of Jerusalem.

The latest escalation was triggered by metal detectors, installed by Israel at the shrine after a deadly Palestinian attack there. Muslim leaders have called for protests.

___

9:30 a.m.

A spokesman has confirmed reports that Israel's government has decided not to overrule an earlier police decision to install metal detectors at a contested Jerusalem holy shrine.

Spokesman David Keyes says the decision was made early Friday by Israel's security Cabinet after an overnight meeting.

The decision to defer to police came amid reports of disagreement among Israel's security services about the need for the metal detectors, which were installed after Palestinian gunmen carried out a deadly attack from the shrine last week.

Muslims have called for mass protests later Friday.

The military and the Shin Bet security services, which deal directly with Palestinians, were reportedly opposed to the devices.

The Cabinet decision came despite appeals by Israel's security ally Jordan, custodian of the shrine, to remove the detectors.

___

9:15 a.m.

An advocacy group says Israeli police have detained 10 prominent Palestinian activists in Jerusalem, including the leader of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' Fatah movement in the city.

The Palestinian Prisoners Club says the city's Fatah chief, Hatem Abdel Khader, was among those detained.

Israeli police were not available for comment.

The detentions came ahead of expected Palestinian mass protests over Israel's decision to install metal detectors at a contested holy site in Jerusalem. Muslim leaders have urged worshippers to pray in the streets Friday rather than walk through metal detectors.

Israel installed the devices after Palestinian gunmen launched a deadly attack from there.

Muslim leaders allege the metal detectors are part of a purported Israeli attempt to expand control over the site.

Israel has denied such allegations.

___

8 a.m.

An Israeli police spokesman says police are banning Muslim men under the age of 50 from a contested Jerusalem shrine ahead of feared mass protests over the installation of metal detectors there.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said Friday that reinforcements are being deployed in and around Jerusalem's Old City, where the walled shrine is located.

He says: "Police and border police units mobilized in all areas and neighborhoods."

Muslim leaders have called for mass protests at Friday noon prayers. They urged worshippers to pray outside the shrine rather than submit to security procedures.

The shrine is revered by Muslims and Jews. Muslim leaders allege Israel is trying to expand its control there by installing the security devices. Police took the action after Palestinians launched a deadly attack from there.

    Before it's here, it's on the Bloomberg Terminal.
    LEARN MORE